Why I Write

There is nothing that keeps me awake at night more than words. Because of them, I toss and turn ceaselessly, hoping not to disturb my mom as she snores softly beside me. I try to stop the words from flashing through my mind as they build phrases then sentences then paragraphs until, finally, I give in. The words don’t stop unless they become something I can’t wait to put on paper.

“I’ll write this in my next article,” I think to myself. “Maybe, just maybe, I can make a difference.”

And that’s what I can do with words. Every day I walk into my journalism class, though I am exhausted by the strings of words that kept me awake the night before, I choose to use them for good. Some people find freedom speeding down the highway at midnight, but I find freedom in my writing. What I cannot say, I know I can write. I use that freedom not only to express my innermost thoughts but to try and move the people in my community to make a difference in their lives and in the lives of others.

Whether I’m writing about teenage homelessness in South Florida or the endless bloodshed in Syria, I find great satisfaction in keeping the students of my school and the local community educated about issues going on in the world. Creating conversation excites me. It moves me to write even more, seeking to find local stories in the globality of my writing and, vice versa, scavenging ways to make my local stories more global.

I spend most nights sitting in front of my computer screen, fussing over comma splices and fragmented sentences because I want my message to come across eloquently; I work hard so that my readers can indulge sentence after sentence without interruption as I immerse them across seas and into the battlefields where the greatest violations of human rights occur. Then I shift them back into reality, showing them that there is something that can be done, something that they, themselves, can do.

And so, as my mom sleeps quietly beside me, I rise from our bed and pick up my laptop. I sit in the bathtub so that the click-clack of the keys do not wake her and I turn down the harsh glare of the brightness to a soft glow. I allow my thoughts to take hold of my fingers and I type away into the night where the world unfolds before me, beckoning to be put in words.

From the Editors: You Can Count on Us

By Edysmar Diaz-Cruz & Daniela Morales

screen-shot-2016-10-14-at-9-10-50-pmAs editors of Miami Lakes Educational Center’s student paper, the Harbinger, we pride ourselves in leading a newsroom comprised of young minds, young talent, and young voices. We may be high schoolers, but we know what it takes to publish authentic news when the student body needs to hear it most. We share the stories that take place within our school, we analyze the politics in our local community, and we are well aware of the struggles facing journalists of the future.

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Legalization of Gay Marriage; the End of One Chapter, the Beginning of Another

By Edysmar Diaz-Cruz

Twitter: @EdysmarDiazCruz

This summer, a paragraph was added to our history books: with a 5-4 vote ruling, same-sex marriage was nationally legalized by the Supreme Court of the United States; backed by the 14th amendment, this decision overturned state bans on same-sex marriage; in other words, all 50 states must issue licenses to same-sex couples and must recognize already established same-sex marriages.

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Holiday Greetings from the Harbinger Staff

Bonds form and strengthen as the Pink Room (where the Harbinger staff meets) endures trials and tribulations that come with our passion for newspaper—a dying aspect of Journalism. In our efforts to keep print news alive, we grow and experience the world while we simultaneously “power young minds through information”.